Wednesday, February 25, 2015

2015 Reading Resolutions update


It's time for a Reading Resolutions update.

1. Participate in at least one 48-hour Reading ChallengeIf not done by June 30, 2015, organize my own. One day I will do this!  Dewey’s  24-hour Read-a-thon is slated for April 25, 2015!

2. Read more books from the below lists.

  • Read 2015 winners/honors for Caldecott, Belpre illustrator, Coretta Scott King (CSK) illustrator, Odyssey(read 31/attempted 4) YALSA non-fiction , and Geisel  (a.k.a. the awards I finished reading in 2013 and again in 2014).  The 2015 winners/honors will be announced on February 2, 2015, adding several titles to my TBR list. Finished Caldecott, Geisel, Belpre illustrator, and CSK illustrator. Currently reading the last of the YALSA non-fiction titles and will soon begin the Odyssey titles.
  • Schneider Family Book Awards - 36 total books 15 read/1 abandoned
  • Stonewall Book Award - Mike Morgan and Larry Romans Children's Young Adult Literature Award 30 total books 22 read/1 abandoned
  • Morris 35 total books 24 read (Finalists announced in December 2014; winner announced February 2, 2015)
  • Read at least six honors/winners from: Newbery (400 total books 92 read/1 abandoned), Printz (77 total books 35 read and 7 abandoned), and CSK author (160 total books. 32 read. 1 abandoned).  Book group’s March book is this year’s Printz winner, so I will start that soon!


Newbery
Our Only May Amelia by Jennifer L. Holm

Printz

CSK author
I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings by Maya Angelou

3. I’ve decided that 2015 is going to be the Year of Non-Fiction.  This means I plan to focus on reading non-fiction titles - not just those on award lists such as YALSA Non-Fiction (25/30 read as of December 15, 2014) and Sibert  (39/53 read as of December 15, 2014) – but non-fiction in general for a variety of ages.  This will include biographies. YALSA Non-fiction finalists were announced in December, but the winner for that award – and the winners and honors for most of the other Youth Media Awards won’t be announced until February 2, 2015. (UPDATED TOTALS: YALSA Non-Fiction (29/30 read) and Sibert (43/59 read)

4. Read the Harry Potter and the Outlander series again. Both are favorites of mine.  After recently watching all of the Harry Potter movies, I realized how many details I had forgotten (that are missing from the movies as well).  I think it is time to revisit the stories.  I’ve listened to the Outlander series twice.  It takes quite some time!  Hopefully by starting them again this month I will finish in time for the next book to be published. (Please be soon.  Please be soon. Please be soon.) I’m participating in a Buddy Read of the Harry Potter series through one of the Goodreads groups I belong to.  So far I have read books 1 and 2, and will start book 3 next week.

5. Set aside time each week to read the libraryland blogs, journals and other news sources. This really needs to be a part of my regular workweek.  Ever since Google’s blog reader bit the dust, I’ve fallen behind on reading blogs.  I’m trying Feedly, but need to get in the habit of checking it on a regular basis.

6. Keep up with tracking books read!  I read over 775 books in 2013.  My goal for 2014 was 1000, and I ended up reading just over that amount. In 2015 I am going to go with a less hectic goal of 500. I have been using Goodreads for years, and plan to continue. I am seriously considering lowering my goal to 250 as I plan to read more novels and non-fiction this year. In fact, I am going to do that after this is posted!  I can always raise it again if desired.

Tuesday, February 17, 2015

January 2015 reads

Here are the titles.  As usual, if the title is in bold that means I rated it five stars on my Goodreads account. 2015 is off to a slow start. I read only 21 books in January.  Almost half were picture books.  As part of my 2015 Reading Resolutions, I started the Harry Potter series.  I had forgotten how innocent the first book is compared to the final book of the series!

Also as part of my 2015 Reading Resolutions I read several books from the various award lists.  Those books are noted in parentheses.  As usual, if the title is in bold that means I rated it five stars on my Goodreads account.
 

Ida M. Tarbell: The Woman Who Challenged Big Business--and Won! by Emily Arnold McCully (YALSA Non-Fiction)
Ruin and Rising by Leigh Bardugo
The Letter Q: Queer Writers' Notes to their Younger Selves by Sarah Moon, James Lecesne, et. al.
Waiting is Not Easy! by Mo Willems
Dangerous Women edited by George R.R. Martin, Gardner R. Dozois
Scar Boys by Len Vlahos (Morris)
A Taste of Temptation by Cat Schield
Saga, Volume 2 by Brian K. Vaughan
Our Only May Amelia by Jennifer L. Holm (Newbery)
It Looked Like Spilt Milk by Charles G. Shaw
Always by My Side by Susan Kerner
Talk Sweetly to Me by Courtney Milan
Gone, Gone, Gone by Hannah Moskowitz (Stonewall)
Popular: Vintage Wisdom for a Modern Geek by Maya Van Wagenen (YALSA Non-Fiction)
A Penguin Story by Antoinette Portis
Penguin by Polly Dunbar
Penguins by Liz Pichon
If You Were a Penguin by Florence Minor
Penguins by Kate Riggs
A Week in the Snow by Gwen Masters
Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone by J.K. Rowling
Neil Patrick Harris: Choose Your Own Autobiography by Neil Patrick Harris

Monday, February 16, 2015

Rub-a-Dub-Dub Preschool storytime plan

One recent storytime theme was splastastic!  For the Music Moment portion of my Rub-a-dub-dub preschool storytime I used the song Splish Splash from the CD A Child's Celebration of Rock 'n' Roll (from Music for Little People).  For the craft I found a fun bathtub coloring sheet.  I gave the kids dot markers and let them go to town making colorful "bubbles".



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Friday, February 13, 2015

ECRR2 - Singing



Every Child Ready to Read 2 (ECRR2) is an early literacy guideline/parent education initiative developed by the Public Library Association (PLA) and Association for Library Service to Children (ALSC) - divisions of the American Library Association.  It was originally released in 2004 and revised a few years later (hence the 2). There are five skills emphasized in ECRR2: Play, Sing, Write, Talk, Read.

This is the fourth in a series of posts about ECRR2, focusing on the five practices.  

The Importance of Singing in Early Literacy Skills

Songs are a natural way to learn about language.  Singing is a simple way to learn about language that comes naturally to children. Through the melodies of songs children will hear words broken down to syllables. Syllables and letter sounds are able to be slowed down and exaggerated in songs making it easier for children to hear.
 
Take any opportunity to sing. Don’t worry about perfect pitch; just have fun! Sing along with the radio. Sing lullabies. Sing children’s tunes. You can even make up your own silly songs. Chants, clapping rhymes, and action rhymes, such as “Miss Suzy had a Steamboat” and “Down Down Baby”, also emphasize the individual syllables of words.

Don’t forget about the classic nursery rhymes!  Many of the rhymes have tunes to accompany them.  If you don’t know the tune, or if the rhyme doesn’t have one, make up one to go with it. Additionally, many beloved children’s songs have picture books that can be used to accompany you as you sing to your child.  Iza Trapani and Jane Cabrera are two authors who have many books of children’s songs, such as It’s Raining, It’s Pouring and Row Row Row Your Boat. 

When your child starts to form her own melodies, encourage her creativity and her vocabulary will grow.  Most importantly, have fun with songs and your child’s literacy skills will continue to flourish.


Tuesday, February 10, 2015

And the winners are - 2015 YMA

image from: Youth Media Awards
On February 2 the Youth Media Awards were announced.  I noticed two things about this years winners and honors.  There was a lot more diversity (likely due to the We Need Diverse Books campaign) and several graphic novels. I was happy to see how many I had already read.  I've marked them on the list below. I've also marked which titles which are on multiple awards  lists (including National Book Award).


Coretta Scott King (Author) Book Award
2015 Winner 

  • Brown Girl Dreaming written by Jacqueline Woodson (Read. National Book Award, Newbery, Sibert)

2015 Honors:

  • The Crossover Kwame Alexander (Newbery)
  • How I Discovered Poetry by Marilyn Nelson illustrated by Hadley Hooper
  • How It Went Down by Kekla Magoon

Coretta Scott King (Illustrator) Book Award
2015 Winner

  • Firebird illustrated by Christopher Myers. The book was written by Misty Copeland

2015 Honors:

  • Josephine: The Dazzling Life of Josephine Baker by Patricia Hruby Powell and illustrated by Christian Robinson (Sibert)
  • Little Melba and Her Big Trombone by Katheryn Russell-Brown and illustrated by Frank Morrison

Coretta Scott King/John Steptoe New Talent Award
2015 Winner

  • When I Was the Greatest by Jason Reynolds 

2015 Winner

  • The Crossover Kwame Alexander (Coretta Scott King)

2015 Honors:

  • El Deafo written and illustrated by Cece Bell (Read)
  • Brown Girl Dreaming by Jacqueline Woodson (Read. Coretta Scott King, National Book Award, Sibert)

2015 Winner

  • I’ll Give You the Sun written by Jandy Nelson (Stonewall)

2015 Honors:

  • And We Stay by Jenny Hubbard,
  • The Carnival at Bray by Jessie Ann Foley (Morris)
  • Grasshopper Jungle by Andrew Smith
  • This One Summer by Mariko Tamaki and illustrated by Jillian Tamaki (Read. Caldecott)

2015 Winner

  • Mikis and the Donkey written by Bibi Dumon Tak, illustrated by Philip Hopman, translated by Laura Watkinson

2015 Honors:

  • Hidden: A Child’s Story of the Holocaust written by Loic Dauvillier, illustrated by Marc Lizano, color by Greg Salsedo, translated by Alexis Siegel (Read)
  • Nine Open Arms written by Benny Lindelauf, illustrated by Dasha Tolstikova, translated by John Nieuwenhuizen.

2015 Winner

  • H. O. R. S. E. A Game of Basketball and Imagination written by Christopher Myers and narrated by Dion Graham and Christopher Myers.

2015 Honors:

  • Five, Six, Seven, Nate! written and narrated by Tim Federle
  • The Scandalous Sisterhood of Prickwillow Place written by Julie Berry and narrated by Jayne Entwistle
  • A Snicker of Magic written by Natalie Lloyd and narrated by Cassandra Morris.

Pura Belpré Illustrator Awards
2015 Winner

  • Viva Frida written and illustrated by Yuyi Morales (Caldecott)

2015 Honors:

  • Little Roja Riding Hood written by Susan Middleton Elya  and illustrated by Susan Guevara (Read)
  • Green Is a Chile Pepper written by Roseanne Greenfield Thong and illustrated by John Parra
  • Separate Is Never Equal: Sylvia Mendez & Her Family’s Fight for Desegregation, illustrated and written by Duncan Tonatiuh (Sibert)

Pura Belpré Author Award
2015 Winner

  • I Lived on Butterfly Hill written by Marjorie Agosín and illustrated by Lee White

2015 Honor:

  • Portraits of Hispanic American Heroes written by Juan Felipe Herrera and illustrated by Raúl Colón

2015 Winner

  • The Adventures of Beekle: The Unimaginary Friend written and illustrated by Dan Santat (Read)

2015 Honors:

  • Nana in the City written and illustrated by Lauren Castillo
  • The Noisy Paint Box: The  Colors and Sounds of Kandinsky’s Abstract Art written by Barb Rosenstock and illustrated by Mary GrandPré
  • Sam and Dave Dig a Hole written by Mac Barnett and  illustrated by Jon Klassen (Read)
  • Viva Frida written and illustrated by Yuyi Morales (Belpré)
  • The Right Word: Roget and His Thesaurus written by Jen Bryant and illustrated by Melissa Sweet (Sibert)
  • This One Summer by Mariko Tamaki and illustrated by Jillian Tamaki (Read. Printz)

2015 Winners

  • A Boy and a Jaguar written by Alan Rabinowitz and illustrated by Catia Chien (ages 0-10) (Read)
  • Rain Reign written by Ann M. Martin (ages 11-13).
  • Girls Like Us written by Gail Giles (ages 13-18)

2015 Winner

  • The Right Word: Roget and His Thesaurus written by Jen Bryant and illustrated by Melissa Sweet (Newbery) 

2015 Honors:

  • Brown Girl Dreaming written by Jacqueline Woodson (Read. National Book Award, Coretta Scott King, Newbery)
  • The Family Romanov: Murder, Rebellion, & the Fall of Imperial Russia written by Candace Fleming (YALSA Non-fiction)
  • Josephine: The Dazzling Life of Josephine Baker by Patricia Hruby Powell and illustrated by Christian Robinson (Coretta Scott King)
  • Neighborhood Sharks: Hunting with the Great Whites of California’s Farallon Islands written and illustrated by Katherine Roy
  • Separate Is Never Equal: Sylvia Mendez & Her Family’s Fight for Desegregation, illustrated and written by Duncan Tonatiuh (Belpré)

2015 Winner

  • This Day in June written by Gayle E. Pitman, Ph.D., illustrated by Kristyna Litten

2015 Honors:

  • Beyond Magenta: Transgender Teens Speak Out written by Susan Kuklin (Read)
  • I’ll Give You the Sun written by Jandy Nelson(Printz)
  • Morris Micklewhite and the Tangerine Dress written by Christine Baldacchino and illustrated by Isabelle Malenfant (Read)


2015 Winner

  • You Are (Not) Small written by Anna Kang and illustrated by Christopher Weyant (Read)

2015 Honors:

  • Mr. Putter & Tabby Turn the Page written by Cynthia Rylant and illustrated by Arthur Howard
  • Waiting Is Not Easy! written and illustrated by Mo Willems (Read)

2015 Winner

  • Gabi, a Girl in Pieces written written by Isabel Quintero (Read)

2015 Honors:

  • The Carnival at Bray written by Jessie Ann Foley (Printz)
  • The Story of Owen: Dragon Slayer of Trondheim written by E.K. Johnston
  • The Scar Boys written by Len Vlahos (Read)
  • The Strange and Beautiful Sorrows of Ava Lavender written by Leslye (Read)

2015 Winner

  • Popular: Vintage Wisdom for a Modern Geek written by Maya Van Wagenen (Read)

2015 Honors:

  • Laughing at My Nightmare written by Shane Burcaw (Read)
  • The Family Romanov: Murder, Rebellion, & the Fall of Imperial Russia written by Candace Fleming
    (Sibert)
  • Ida M. Tarbell: The Woman Who Challenged Big Business—and Won! written by Emily Arnold McCully (Read)
  • The Port Chicago 50: Disaster, Mutiny, and the Fight for Civil Rights written by Steve Sheinkin (Read. National Book Award)